scold


scold
1. verb

Mom took Anna away, scolding her for her bad behavior

Syn:
rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reprove, admonish, remonstrate with, chastise, chide, upbraid, berate, take to task, read someone the riot act, give someone a piece of one's mind, rake/haul someone over the coals; informal tell off, dress down, give someone an earful, rap over the knuckles, let someone have it, bawl out, give someone hell, give someone what for, chew out, ream (out), light into; formal castigate
See note at rebuke
Ant:
praise
2. noun, archaic

she is turning into a scold

Syn:
nag, shrew, fishwife, harpy, termagant, harridan; complainer, moaner, grumbler; informal kvetch
••
scold, berate, chide, revile, upbraid, vituperate
A mother might scold a child who misbehaves, which means to rebuke in an angry, irritated, and often nagging way, whether or not such treatment is justified. Chide is a more formal term than scold, and it usually implies disapproval for specific failings (she was chided by her teacher for using "less" instead of "fewer"), while berate suggests a prolonged scolding, usually aimed at a pattern of behavior or way of life rather than a single misdeed and often combined with scorn or contempt for the person being criticized (he berated his parents for being too protective and ruining his social life). Upbraid also implies a lengthy expression of displeasure or criticism, but usually with more justification than scold and with an eye toward encouraging better behavior in the future (the tennis coach upbraided her players for missing so many serves). Revile and vituperate are reserved for very strong or even violent displays of anger. To revile is to use highly abusive and contemptuous language (revile one's opponent in the press), while vituperate connotes even more violence in the attack (the angry hockey players were held apart by their teammates, but they continued to vituperate each other with the foulest possible language).

Thesaurus of popular words. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • scold — n shrew, vixen, termagant, *virago, amazon scold vb Scold, upbraid, rate, berate, tongue lash, jaw, bawl, chew out, wig, rail, revile, vituperate can all mean to reprove, reproach, or censure angrily, harshly, and more or less abusively. Scold,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • scold´er — scold «skohld», verb, noun. –v.t. to find fault with; blame with angry words: »His brother scolded him for breaking the baseball bat. –v.i. 1. to find fault; talk angrily: »Don t scold so much. 2. Obsolete. to quarrel noisily; brawl. ╂[< noun] …   Useful english dictionary

  • Scold — Scold, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scolded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scolding}.] [Akin to D. schelden, G. schelten, OHG. sceltan, Dan. skielde.] To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scold — Scold, n. 1. One who scolds, or makes a practice of scolding; esp., a rude, clamorous woman; a shrew. [1913 Webster] She is an irksome, brawling scold. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A scolding; a brawl. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skəuld US skould] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] to angrily criticize someone, especially a child, about something they have done = ↑tell off ▪ Do not scold the puppy, but simply and firmly say no. scold… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • scold — scold·er; scold·ing·ly; scold; …   English syllables

  • Scold — Scold, v. t. To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skōld] n. [ME scolde < ON skald, poet (prob. of satirical verses)] a person, esp. a woman, who habitually uses abusive language vt. [ME scolden < the n.] to find fault with angrily; rebuke or chide severely vi. 1. to find fault angrily 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • scold — index castigate, denounce (condemn), disapprove (condemn), fault, inveigh, rebuke, remonstrate …   Law dictionary

  • scold — (n.) mid 12c., person of ribald speech, also person fond of abusive language, from O.N. skald poet (see SKALD (Cf. skald)). The sense evolution may reflect the fact that Germanic poets (like their Celtic counterparts) were famously feared for… …   Etymology dictionary

  • scold — [v] find fault with abuse, admonish, asperse, berate, blame, castigate, cavil, censure, chasten, chide, criticize, denounce, disparage, dress down*, expostulate, give a talking to*, jump on*, keep aft*, lay down the law*, lecture, light into*,… …   New thesaurus